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Most modern memory cards contain a single NAND flash chip and a smaller controller chip that provides a high-level interface to the data, implemented with a microcontroller that runs software which understands the host protocol (MMC, USB, ATA, ...) and abstracts the block allocation, bad block management, wear leveling and garbage collection that is necessary to be done on the NAND chip.

See also [https://lwn.net/Articles/428584/] for a detailed description of some of the concepts.

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The next kernel will be released when it is ready. There is no strict timeline for making releases, but if you really need an educated guess, visit the Linux kernel PHB Crystal Ball -- it tries to provide a ballpark guess based on previous kernel release schedule.

Typically we don't promote products here, but this one seems quite interesting. From their website: "You can change the way products are made, starting with a single Phone. Together, we’re opening up the Supply Chain, and redefining the Economy – one step at a time."

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Kernel developers working on the x86 architecture are spoiled; they develop for hardware that, for the most part, identifies itself when asked, with the result that it is usually easy to figure out how a specific machine is put together. Other architectures — most notably ARM — are rather messier in this regard, requiring the kernel to learn about the configuration of the hardware from somewhere other than the hardware itself.

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It’s beginning to look as if the naysayers are right about Mark Shuttleworth’s hopes to raise $32 million to produce about 40,000 Ubuntu Edge devices. It ain’t going to happen, unless he manages to pull another rabbit out of the hat. Right now, his Indiegogo campaign is stalled at a little over $7 million, where it’s been for several days.

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